Spring 2017 Course Guide

Students must complete the 350:101/102 requirement before enrolling in another English course.

Undergraduate | MA | MFA | Summer Writers Conference | Download the Guide (PDF)

Undergraduate Courses

Critical Methods in English
50:350:220:01 MWF 10:10-11:05
FitzGerald
An introduction to English studies, this course leads students through the key moves of analysis and interpretation in reading and writing about literary texts, including poems, plays, and fictional and nonfictional genres. In particular, we will use Digging into Literature: Strategies for Reading, Analysis and Writing as the major teaching text to help us understand a range of poems, a play and its film adaptation (Shakespeare’s The Tempest), a short novel (Henry James’ Turn of the Screw), a graphic memoir (Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home), and a classic autobiography (Frederick Douglas’ Narrative). Through our efforts, we will learn to respond to texts, engage scholarly sources, and compose literary analyses through a series of exercises, short papers, and a longer critical essay. This course satisfies the College “Writing Intensive” requirement.

Literatures in English I
50:350:221:01 TTh 11:00-12:20
Fiske
This course covers English literature from Old English through to the Restoration. Texts and authors include Beowulf, Chaucer, Marlowe, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Marvell, and Milton. We will study representative texts within their historical, political, and intellectual contexts. Requirements include active class participation, quizzes and short assignments, two formal papers, a mid-term, and a final exam.

Literatures in English II
50:350:222:01 TTh 9:30-10:50
Habib
A survey, within their historical contexts, of some of the renowned texts of English and American literature from 1660 to 1900.

Animation Mystique
Sentient Toys, Objects, and Automata
50:350:224:01 TTh 1:30-2:50
Blackford
This course interrogates inanimate beings who achieve sentience and explore boundaries between human and machine/object. We will cover the various automata of E. T. Hoffmann and how they crept into the work of Hawthorne and Alcott; Collodi’s famous puppet Pinocchio and his progeny in early cinema and animated film; a few of the Oz books (Wizard, Patchwork Girl, Tin Woodman); the animation of Vladislav Starewicz, who animated insects and who created the first film of a toy coming to life (The Mascot), influencing Tim Burton; The Velveteen Rabbit, Little Machinery, and other dolls, machines, and cyborgs in various media (avant-garde drama and essays, Octavia Butler’s “Bloodchild,” Philip Kirk’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, and Blade Runner); and the most interesting animation of Disney, Pixar, and others who focus on animation as theme and form, and the dilemmas of nonhuman creatures (Ji?í Trnka’s The Hand and Henson’s Muppets; Disney’s Pinocchio and Roger Rabbit; Lasseter’s early Brave Little Toaster and later Toy Story; Burton’s Edward Scissorhands; Kid?tai’s Ghost in the Shell). Please contact me if you’d like to see particular works on the syllabus. Counts towards the Digital Studies Major and Minor.

Special Topics: African American Poetry
50:350:225:40 M 6:00-8:40
Pardlo
Since Phillis Wheatley shot to literary stardom in 1773, African American poets have responded to racial attitudes in resourceful and distinguishing ways. In this course, we will consider the foundations of African American poetry, and the ways African American poets continue to shape and respond to the evolving American landscape.

Special Topics: Gendering the Medical Glaze
50:350:226:90 Online
Lewty
This course will analyze representations of women and illness in narratives from diverse languages, time periods, genres, and media. We will center on the phenomena dubbed ‘cyberchondria’ – a combination of health anxiety and the practice of searching for information about medical issues online. Research has shown that individuals with higher levels of health anxiety statistically seek online information more frequently, which further exacerbates anxiety. Gender is one of the intriguing variables to explore in regard to this phenomenon, since there is a higher female incidence of these behaviors. We will track the development of cultural discourses of the female body as physically weakened and prone to diseases that require ‘treatment,’ and further investigate how significant such narratives have been to the contemporary digitized environment, where the female body is as dissected and evaluated as much as it always was. The course aims to take an interdisciplinary approach to the topic of gender and medical conditions, therefore the content will include fiction, memoir, popular literature, poetry, film, television, the history of science, new media, and visual art.

World Masterpieces I
50:350:238:90 Online
Meredith
This course illuminates the literature of the cultures that make us essentially Western: Hebrew, Greek, and Roman. Through Old Testament texts, Greek epics and tragedies, Roman epic poetry, we receive the values we still consider foundational…monotheism, governance by law, valor in the face of adversity, logic. We follow these threads into the Middle Ages in Europe and see how Dante and Chaucer are informed by these values.

European Itineraries
50:350:241:01 MWF 11:15-12:10
Hostetter
Medieval European Itineraries explores travel as a foundational activity for the early European imagination. How are fictional and literary accounts of the world enabled by the activity of travel? Why are quests, which often take a protagonist to dangerous and distant realms, often synonymous with character development? What is the social usefulness of travel as an educational process? We will start off with two ancient accounts of travel (one Biblical, the other Classical), and then plunge headlong into an exploration of our own of the Middle Ages and its conceptions of not just the physical world but also of the universe enabled by moving, at least intellectually, through geographical space. Along the way we will read Arthurian quest romances, tours of Hell and Heaven, as well as the accounts of actual world travelers (such as Marco Polo), before finishing with a contemporary novel about medieval travel.

The Romantic Period
Romanticism(s)
50:350:222:01 MW 1:20-2:40
Barbarese
Why the plural? Because Romanticism(s) proposes how the competing brands of Romanticism straddled lines of gender, ethnicity, periodicity, and aesthetic form. The course covers both British Romantic poetry (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge and P.B. Shelley) and prose (Austen, Mary Shelley), before moving to America (Whitman, Poe, Melville and Douglass) and France (Baudelaire, Hugo) and into the 20th Century, looking at the work of the Romantic Moderns (Stevens, Crane, Woolf) and post-modern examples (Pynchon and Gaiman). Two papers, an examination and occasional quizzes.

Victorian Literature
50:350:324:01 TTh 9:30-10:50
Fiske
This course covers the poetry and prose of England during the reign of Queen Victoria (1837-1901). Our thematic focus will be on the Victorians’ own attempts to redefine the role of literature, writers, and the intellectual life during the first half century of industrialism. During this time, rapid shifts in England’s social structure and the nation’s quest for practical and material gains prompted reassessments of the values that had previously formed the foundations of literary culture. In attempting to understand the nature and impact of these social and ideological reformations, we will explore the dialogues and arguments between and among poets and cultural critics, liberals and conservatives, scientists and humanists, men and women. Our authors include Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, Dante Gabriel and Christina Rossetti, Carlyle, Newman, Ruskin, Mill, Emily Brontë, Harriet Martineau, Swinburne, Pater, Wilde, Hardy, and Yeats. Course requirements include active class participation, several short writing assignments, two formal papers, a mid-term and a final exam.

Special Topics in Writing/ Media
Designing Publication for the Web
50:350:329:01 MW 1:20-2:40
Dubose
This course serves as an introduction to both media production and major ideas in new media criticism. We will engage with and create texts in several mediums (video games, podcasts, websites and more) while discussing the social and cultural impact of new forms of media. This course satisfies the College “Writing Intensive” requirement.

Modern Drama
50:350:353:90 Online
Moorhead
daniel.moorhead@rutgers.edu

Literature of Childhood
50:350:360:01 TTh 1:30-2:50
Singley
We read well known and much loved classics of children’s and young adult literature, including class fairy tales, nursery rhymes, poems, short stories, and novels. We explore how children’s literature has developed over time and speaks to changing needs and interests of children. We read critically, asking such questions as, What is children’s literature? What is a child? How do elements of literature work together to produce memorable or great writing? What is appropriate literature for various age groups? How does a book become a classic? Why teach children’s literature? How should children’s literature be taught and enjoyed? Selections are drawn from English, American, European, Asian, and African traditions. The course is intended for English majors, students seeking teaching certification, and interested non-majors. It contains a Civic Engagement component that allows you to apply concepts learned in the course to children in a school setting. This course fulfills the Global requirement.

Learning Abroad
Inside India: Exploring the Country’s History, Culture and Mass Media
50:350:389:I1 By arrangement
Capuzzo
This Learning Abroad course, which is being offered to both undergraduate and graduate students, will explore a vast array of issues facing India and give Rutgers students the up-close chance to research and report on these subjects first hand while traveling in India, an opportunity typically limited to the elite group of journalists who are assigned to such highly coveted foreign bureaus. During alternating weekly classes both before and after the trip, we will discuss the history, media and culture of India, and issues pertaining to the role and function of journalism there and in developing countries as a whole. Students will gain a firm understanding of the country’s past and present and learn to make connections between India’s history and the kinds of stories that are being reported there today. These in-class discussions will be reinforced by a 12-day trip during Spring Break to India’s Golden Triangle: the cities of Delhi, Agra and Jaipur, plus Ranthambhore National Park. Highlights of our fully-guided trip will include touring the site where Gandhi was killed in Delhi, a dawn visit to the Taj Mahal in Agra, elephant rides at the Amber Fort in Jaipur, a two-day tiger-viewing safari at the national park, visits to top Indian newspaper and television headquarters and meeting with faculty and students at a university program focusing on international communications. Students will maintain a culture blog throughout the semester, an experiential journal during our travels, and produce a magazine-type article by the end of the semester based on their research and in-country reporting.

Capstone: Consumption
50:350:415:01 MWF 10:10-11:05
Hostetter
We do it every day and depend upon it in order to survive. Consumption. We eat food and use commodities. It is our main task as part of the American middle class. However, the idea of consumption tends to be under-theorized in most economic models. Even if we are conceived of as consuming agents, how and why we consume what we do is only superficially studied, as if too much attention would expose as false the cherished mythology of the liberated, democratic consumer, a romantic hero who confronts and conquers the wilderness of the free market. De gustibus non disputandum (about taste there is no argument), a sentiment that social theories often concede, refusing to argue the problem of consumer taste. But taste and desire are not forces beyond discourse—if they were there would be no purpose in advertising. Rather, these fundamental aspects of social identity are thoroughly constructed, products of conscious choice and unconscious manipulation, pervaded by discourse, subject to power. The business of this seminar will be to attempt to collect, engage, and understand various ideas and theories about consumption, using both literary and theoretical texts to draw it out as a legitimate area of study.

Capstone: American Short Fiction
50:350:416:01 TTh 4:30-5:50
Singley
Acclaimed short stories and novels by noted American authors such as Hawthorne, Poe, Wharton, London, Cather, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Welty, Salinger, Carver, Walker, Silko. We explore this fiction in terms of aesthetics, in historical and cultural context, and in light of critical theories. Short papers and presentations; a final project or paper.

Special Topics: American Horror Story
50:352:393:01 MW 2:50-4:10
Sayre
A critic once wrote that in order to understand American literature, you must understand the horror it describes. “Horror,” he said, “is essential to our literature.” This course will look at broad range of American literary and cultural artifacts in an attempt to better understand how authors use horror to explore their world or to imagine others. We will be studying about the work of horror itself, its structure and relationship to the reader, and using that study to think critically about how horror shapes, reflects, or troubles an distinctly American character. We will look at horror in poems, short stories, and novels, as well as comics and movies. Readings will include works by Edgar Allan Poe, H.P. Lovecraft, Toni Morrison, Cormac McCarthy, and Robert Kirkman.

Special Topics in Film: Images of the City
50:354: 211:01 TTh 3:00-4:20
Rosal
In this course we will use a variety of texts—film, books, audio—to examine the city as a setting and subject. In particular, we will discuss urban life both within and across racial lines. How are figures from African-American, Latino-American, and Asian-American communities portrayed in literature and film? What, if any, is their interaction with one another? Authors whose work we are likely to read include James Baldwin, Sandra Cisneros, Jamaal May, and Lauryn Hill. Filmmakers are likely to include Thomas A. Edison, Ridley Scott, Spike Lee, Dave Chappelle, and Grace Lee.

History of Film II
50:354:301:90 Online
Sorrento
This course will focus on cinema from the end of World War II to the new millennium, with attention to developments in film style. We will begin with post-war works, including Sunset Blvd (1950), Singing in the Rain (1952), and Ida Lupino’s The Hitchhiker (1953), then focus on American cinema’s transition in the 1960s and 1970s (with films by Stanley Kubrick, John Frankenheimer, Robert Altman, and emerging directors). The course will conclude with the “Return to Myths” era (George Lucas and company) and lead into the postmodern films of the 1990s.

Literature and Film: Shakespeare on Page, Stage, Screen
50:354:310:01 MW 4:20-5:40
Farquhar
We will study how Shakespeare has been represented on film by comparing and contrasting 2 movie versions of the same play, focusing on what the directors choose to highlight and why. Our analysis of the texts themselves will concentrate on how the plays were performed, and, in the light of recent research, suggest that Shakespeare was much more radical and politically committed than has previously been thought. The plays we will study are Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Twelfth Night and King Lear. Fulfills the Shakespeare requirement.

Screenwriting
50:354:395:40 MW 6:00-7:20
Mokhberi
This course is concerned with the fundamentals of writing for film with a focus on story structure. We will examine various screenwriting paradigms and look at what works and why by analyzing existing screenplays and through script to screen comparisons. We will also look at the evolution of the screenplay form, discuss style, and how to best write for the screen. There is a substantial script reading component and students will outline a feature length screenplay and write the first act (~20-25p). The course can be used as an elective for English majors and Film Studies minors and the prerequisite is English Comp II.

Law and Order: Reporting on Police, the Courts and the Criminal Justice System
50:570:308:01 TTh 1:30-2:50
Capuzzo
For many new reporters, covering the police or courts may be their first assignment – subjects for which they have little training or experience, and even less understanding of how these beats may reflect upon today’s larger societal issues, from race relations to community involvement to political agendas. This course will explore the many aspects of criminal justice news reporting, as well as looking at the explosive issues surrounding our how justice is carried out in the US, and the role the media plays in examining and exposing modern day practices. The first half of the course will focus on covering police procedures and issues, where students will learn how to navigate police departments, develop sources, cover investigations, unravel crime statistics and explore some of the controversies surrounding current policing practices. The second half will focus on the courts, from local to state to federal, and the penalty phase. Students will learn to follow a case through the process, understand the players, trace paper trails and understand ultimate dispositions. We will visit a local police department, meet with court officials and visit the county jail. Students taking this course should have a working knowledge of the news and an awareness of the more recent issues surrounding America’s criminal justice system.

Linguistics and Literature
50:615:331:01 TTh 3:00-4:20
Epstein

In this course, we will take some of the classic tools of linguistics, sociolinguistics and the philosophy of language and use them in the analysis of passages from literary texts. The bulk of the course will be an introduction to the discipline of stylistics, the linguistic study of literature. We will cover topics such as: the foreground/background distinction, conversational structure, speech acts, politeness, inference, point of view and speech/thought presentation. We will also devote a significant amount of time to the study of metaphor and metonymy. In addition to studying the basic concepts, strong emphasis will be placed on learning how to apply each of these notions to the analysis of sample texts.

Course requirements: Midterm, final exam and several short (2 page) papers.

Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphs
50:615:386:01 TTh 1:30-2:50
Toth
This is a comprehensive introduction to the language and culture of the Ancient Egyptian writing of the Middle Kingdom (and afterwards) known as the Early Middle or Classical Egyptian. No previous knowledge of grammatical terms is assumed. The material studied in class provides the students with sufficient vocabulary and grammar to read original Egyptian documents written in hieroglyphs. During the course artifacts from museums around the world will be analyzed and discussed. The course includes a field trip to the Egyptian section of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Writing Public Arguments
50:989:300:01 TTh 11:00-12:20
Staff

50:989:300:90 Online
Fandler

The fundamental techniques of argument, demonstration, and persuasion; analysis of sample readings and extensive writing practice. This course satisfies the College “Writing Intensive” requirement.

Art of Revision
50:989:301:01 MW 11:15-12:10
F Hybrid
Vial

Practice in the art of constructing clear, concise prose, with emphasis on developing a personal style. This course satisfies the College “Writing Intensive” requirement.

Technical Communication
50:989:302:90 Online
Decarolis

In this course, we’ll focus on multimedia technical communication in the form of videos and infographics. Opportunities for creating instructional materials are no longer limited to the classroom, curated by experts. People consult Google and YouTube every day, whether to search for a decent cupcake recipe, steps for factoring an algebraic equation, or a video demonstrating how to change your car’s oil. Learning is no longer a formal process; it is an everyday experience. But what makes a “how-to” effective? What compels users to click away from some videos and websites in search of something better? This course will use these questions to explore and examine learning, memory, and the mechanics of designing effective digital instruction. We’ll then apply these methods in the creation of “how-tos” in multiple modalities. In our efforts to explore and conceive effective instruction, we’ll also examine and discuss the implications of copyright for digital materials, universal design, and user experience design on technical communication.

Introduction to Creative Writing
50:989:305:90 Online
Janos
There’s something enigmatic about good storytelling: it’s hard to pin down what it is, exactly, that makes a story good. Unlike in some other academic disciplines, a “winning” product can’t be easily boiled down to its composite parts. Yet despite this, creative writing isn’t entirely subjective, either; there are qualities that all good stories share, rooted in craft: craft that can be learned, craft that all great storytellers master. In this online-only class, you will study the fundamentals of good storytelling through reading and analyzing great works of both fiction and nonfiction. Once we’ve gone over the basics you and your classmates will begin writing your own work to share with one another, so that you may learn about the process of revising through peer critique while also learning how to become careful readers of literature-in-progress.

Fiction Writing Workshop
50:989:307:01 TTh 3:00-4:20
Struck
In this workshop students will write and submit short stories or novel excerpts for critique by the class and the instructor. Students will provide thoughtful and constructive feedback to their classmates. Part of the course will also be dedicated to the study of classic and contemporary published examples of the short story.

Writing New Media
50:989:312:91 MW 9:05-10:00
F Hybrid
Dubose

This course serves as an introduction to both media production and major ideas in new media criticism. We will engage with and create texts in several mediums (video games, podcasts, websites and more) while discussing the social and cultural impact of new forms of media. This course satisfies the College “Writing Intensive” requirement.

Writing for Non-Profit
50:989: 313:40 T 6:00-8:50
Falk
This course will introduce students to the many types of writing required for success in the non-profit world, from the fundamentals of writing a funding proposal to building a communication strategy that effectively transmits an organization’s mission to the public. Along the way, the genres of writing students learn will convey a sense of how the different entities within a nonprofit – programming, fundraising, and communications, at the bare minimum – work together. This course is designated as a civic engagement course, which means that students will be required to partner with non-profit organizations in the city of Camden, and that final projects will also help fulfill a need expressed by one of those organizations. This component of the course will require visits to organization sites and conversations with staff outside of class and off campus. This course satisfies the College “Writing Intensive” requirement.

Designing Publications for the Web
50:989:300:01 MW 1:20-2:40
Dubose
This course will train students in the process of producing digital publications. Beginning by soliciting and selecting appropriate material, we will learn principles of digital publishing and design as well as methods of proofreading and editing. Students will be introduced to multiple desktop publishing applications and venues for web presentation. The course will culminate in the creation of a single publication by the entire class. This course satisfies the College “Writing Intensive” requirement.

Graduate Courses: MA in English

Learning Abroad
Inside India: Exploring the Country’s History, Culture and Mass Media
56:350:505:I1 By arrangement
Capuzzo
This Learning Abroad course, which is being offered to both undergraduate and graduate students, will explore a vast array of issues facing India and give Rutgers students the up-close chance to research and report on these subjects first hand while traveling in India, an opportunity typically limited to the elite group of journalists who are assigned to such highly coveted foreign bureaus. During alternating weekly classes both before and after the trip, we will discuss the history, media and culture of India, and issues pertaining to the role and function of journalism there and in developing countries as a whole. Students will gain a firm understanding of the country’s past and present and learn to make connections between India’s history and the kinds of stories that are being reported there today. These in-class discussions will be reinforced by a 12-day trip during Spring Break to India’s Golden Triangle: the cities of Delhi, Agra and Jaipur, plus Ranthambhore National Park. Highlights of our fully-guided trip will include touring the site where Gandhi was killed in Delhi, a dawn visit to the Taj Mahal in Agra, elephant rides at the Amber Fort in Jaipur, a two-day tiger-viewing safari at the national park, visits to top Indian newspaper and television headquarters and meeting with faculty and students at a university program focusing on international communications. Students will maintain a culture blog throughout the semester, an experiential journal during our travels, and produce a magazine-type article by the end of the semester based on their research and in-country reporting.

Introduction to Literary Theory
56:350:573:01 M 6:00-8:50
Habib
Is there a correct way of interpreting a piece of literature? Should we just read the “words on the page” as suggested by some critics in the early twentieth century or should we take into account the author’s biography, social class, psychology and audience? What is the purpose of literature? Moral? Political? Simply pleasure? These are some of the questions posed by the greatest thinkers from Plato and Aristotle through Hegel and Marx to modern movements such as Psychoanalysis, Feminism, Reception Theory, Deconstruction, Gender theory and Postcolonialism. This class will cover selectively the history of Western literary criticism from Plato to the present day.

Special Topics: American Literary History
56:352:540:01 W 6:00-8:40
Sayre
This seminar is a survey of American literature, from its origins to the present. We will cover major movements in American thought and letters, focusing our study through a number of individual texts that both contribute to and challenge the American literary canon. This course should broaden your understanding of American literature as a whole, its major authors, genres, and intellectual history. Counts towards American and pre-1800 requirement.

Special Topics: African-American Childhoods in 20th Century Fiction
56:352:594:01 Th 6:00-8:40
Green
Soon after St. Claire gifts the enslaved African American child Topsy to Miss Ophelia in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Ophelia asks the young girl if she knows who made her. In response, Topsy muses: “I spect I grow’d. Don’t think nobody never made me.” Aside from displaying the heavy dialect and sensational representations that belie Stowe’s anti-slavery intentions, Topsy’s response also brings into stark relief the view of African American children for much of American literary history: they are things, not people, without lineage, history, or (save for integration into white families) a future.

This course examines representations of African American childhood in twentieth century literature. It seeks to understand mainstream conceptualizations of black youth but also how African American authors, in particular, have processed and responded to these understandings as well as articulated their own sense of black childhood based on their own specific visions and influences. Representative texts and authors include W.E.B. Dubois and Jessie Fauset’s The Brownies’ Book (1920-21), Gwendolyn Brooks’s Annie Allen (1949), James Baldwin’s Go Tell it on the Mountain (1953), and Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye (1970).

Counts toward the Childhood, Literature/Culture Track.

Graduate Courses: MFA in Creative Writing

The following courses are open to students registered in the MFA program. Some space may be available to English MA students by permission of Lauren Grodstein.

Craft: Poetic Forms
56:200:511:01 T 3:00-5:40
Pardlo
Think of form as a kind of attire: we can tell a lot about a poem by the way it is dressed. Some poems are decked out in uniform and regalia, while others might sport a patchwork of thrift store-chic and bespoke designs. What can we read in poetic form relative to content, and how can we use form deliberately so that our poems don’t look like we’re forcing them into musty hand-me-downs? MA students may register with permission of the MFA Director.

Fiction Workshop
56:200:518:01 Th 3:00-5:40
Grodstein
Students will submit stories or novel excerpts for critique by their classmates and the professor. The workshop will be complemented by analysis of published fiction.

Creative Nonfiction
Life Writing
56:200:529:01 M 6:00-8:40
Barbarese
In some very obvious sense, all writing is creative, and with few exceptions very little (if any?) creative writing is not autobiographical. A workshop whose principal focus is student work, the course will examine the boundaries separating fiction and autobiography and how those boundaries are measured, blurred, or ignored. It includes an introduction to stylistics, a brief overflight of the history and meaning of CNF and its emergence from parent models, and readings in the genre. Weekly discussions of student work and a final project.

Craft: Point of View
56:200:568:01 M 3:00-5:40
Zeidner
This craft class will look at the surprisingly complex questions about how fiction uses narrative point of view. We’ll discuss the differences between omniscient and third person limited viewpoints, first person, the notion of reliability in narration, and many other issues, including the voices of children and talking chimps.

Special Topics in Craft: Writing Music
56:200:573:01 T 6:00-8:40
Rosal
This course will take a broad approach to the intersection between music and writing. We will look at many writers who write about music for sure and and the variations of music writing from one literary genre and form to another. We’ll also think about music itself as a cousin to literary composition and we’ll ask what we can learn about our own aesthetics —both conceptually and practically — from the history and craft of composers and musicians. Our study will likely include work from Amiri Baraka (Leroi Jones), James Baldwin, Ishmael Reed, John Cage, and others. Open to MA students. Counts toward the MA Writing Studies Track.

Final Creative Thesis

56:200:651:01 BA Barbarese

56:200:651:02 BA Black

56:200:651:03 BA Funderburg

56:200:651:05 BA Pardlo

56:200:651:06 BA Rosal

56:200:651:07 BA Zeidner

56:200:651:08 BA Grodstein

Thesis: Before registering for the thesis class, the MFA student must seek out and request an MFA professor to advise his or her thesis. The student must then register for the thesis class under the name of his or her adviser.

Summer Writers’ Conference 2017

The 32nd annual Rutgers-Camden Summer Writers’ Conference will start June 2017 (exact dates TBD). An intensive, inspiring and informative ten-day conference of writing workshops, craft classes, agent and editor presentations, and readings, the Conference features a dozen nationally-known writers, including Tom Sleigh, Ada Calhoun, and Diane McKinney-Whetstone.

The conference can be taken for graduate and undergraduate credit, as well as on a certificate basis.

Visit the writers conference site for details or contact Professor Lisa Zeidner, lisa.zeidner@rutgers.edu.