Contact Information

Armitage Hall, Fourth Floor
311 N. Fifth St.
Camden NJ 08102
Phone: (856) 225-6121
Fax: (856) 225-2873
Email the department

Twitter

Student Spotlight

We R Rutgers-Camden: Natalie Midiri

Natalie Midiri"My experiences participating in undergraduate research at Rutgers-Camden, with opportunities like CURCA, has been a key factor in my career choice as well as my decision to continue my education in the field of rhetoric." Read more ...

Selected Faculty Books

Home » Undergraduate Program » English Courses Listed by Category

English Courses Listed by Category

Courses (English Literature 350)

Writing Program

50:350:098 Basic Reading and Writing Skills for Nonnative Speakers (R) (NC)
The goal of English 098 is to prepare nonnative English speakers for writing at the college level and for entry into English 100.  098 is the equivalent of 099 (Basic Reading and Writing Skills for native speakers).

50:350:099 Basic Reading and Writing Skills (R) (NC)
Provides training in critical reading and writing. Students will study the structure and presentation of ideas, practice analyzing texts and developing logical arguments about them, and author clear and coherent sentences, paragraphs, and short academic essays.
Load equivalent to a 3-credit course.

50:350:100 English Composition I for Nonnative Speakers (R) (3)
English 100 is the second course in the two-course ESL sequence and is the ESL equivalent of English 101 for native speakers.

50:350:101-102 English Composition I,II (R) (3,3)
Instruction and practice in writing expository prose, including a documented research report. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the New Jersey College Basic Skills Placement Test or successful completion of 50:350:099.

Literary Skills: Reading and Writing

50:350:220 Critical Methods in English (W) (3)
Survey of research sources and critical approaches to be used in reading and writing about literary texts, including materials available on the internet. Prerequisites: 50:350:101 and 102. Curriculum 50:350 students only.

50:350:221 Literatures in English I (3)
Historical survey of literatures written in English (primarily British and American literatures) from the Middle Ages through 1660.

50:350:222 Literatures in English II (3)
Historical survey of literatures written in English (from Britain, America, and various parts of the world) from 1660 to 1900.

50:350:223 Literatures in English III (G) (3)
Survey of 20th-century literatures from various parts of the world, with emphasis on colonial and postcolonial themes.

50:350:251 Ten Books I Should Have Read by Now (3)
Reexamines standard literary texts in secondary school curricula, asking fundamental questions about the process of canon formation.

Rhetoric and Literary Theory

50:350:160 Texts and Theories (3)
Survey of critical approaches to reading and writing about literary texts.

50:350:326 Introduction to Rhetoric (3)
An overview of key concepts in rhetoric–the art of persuasion–through study of their application across a wide range of texts and contexts in politics, popular culture, and public affairs.

50:350:327 History of Rhetoric (3)
A survey of major texts and ideas in the rhetorical tradition from its roots in Greco-Roman culture to the present.

50:350:328 Special Topics in Rhetoric (3)
An in-depth study of a particular aspect or application of rhetorical theory.

50:350:329 Special Topics in Writing and Media (3)
An in-depth study of a particular issue in the study of writing and media.

50:350:441 Literary Theory and Criticism (3)
A study of major approaches to literature ranging from Plato and Aristotle to the present.

World Literature

50:350:232 World Novel in the 20th Century (G) (3)
Major novels from the literatures of Europe, Latin America, Africa, and the East, read in translation.

50:350:238 World Masterpieces I (3)
Studies in great works of world literature from antiquity to the early modern era. Prerequisite: 50:350:102.

50:350:239 World Masterpieces II (G) (3)
Studies in great works of world literature from the dawn of the modern era to the present.

50:350:281 Asian Narratives (G) (3)
Fiction, poetry, and essays by Asian-American and Asian-British authors, and by writers from the Near, Middle, and Far East, read in translation.

50:350:346 World Drama (G) (3)
A survey of drama throughout the world from Western and non-Western classics to forerunners of modern realism.

50:350:354 Postcolonial Literature (G) (3)
A study of major postcolonial literary texts and theories. Formerly 50:352:353.

50:350:355 Modern World Literature (G) (3)
A comparative study of selected literary texts–fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry–from around the globe.

50:350:431 World Novel to 1900 (G) (3)
Major novels selected from such world literatures as Russian, French, Spanish, Japanese, and German, read in translation.

Children’s Literature

50:350:243 Children’s Literature, Film, Media, and Animation (3)
A study of children’s literature in multiple media, including textual, pictorial, visual, digital, interactive, and animated.

50:350:360 Literature of Childhood (G) (3)
A study of classic and contemporary literature read and enjoyed by children and adolescents, including fairy tales, folklore, fantasy, picture books, chapter books, the adolescent novel, and poetry.  Formerly 50:350:246.

50:350:361 Literary and Cultural Constructions of Childhood (D) (3)
A study of changing representations of childhood in literary and cultural texts, including the impact of childhood on imagination, and intellectual, aesthetic traditions.

50:350:362 Children’s Literature in Print and Film (3)
Selected texts in children’s literature studied alongside film adaptations of these texts.

Religion and Literature

50:350:334 The Bible as Literature (3)
A study of the Bible, its literary variety, and historical and religious development.

50:350:378 Religion in Literature (3)
A study of religious themes in British and American literature from the 17th century to the present.

50:350:380 Mythology (G) (3)
Narratives of interaction between human and divine, as retold in literature and cultures including ancient Greek and Judeo-Christian.

50:350:384 Literature of the Islamic World (G) (3)
A study of literary and philosophical texts of the Islamic world in their historical context.

Literary Periods

50:350:316 Medieval Literature (3)
Survey of literature, from Beowulf through the 15th century: plays, songs, adventure narratives, religious allegories, and other genres.

50:350:317 English Renaissance Literature (3)
A study of major authors, including More, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Donne.

50:350:318 Seventeenth-Century Literature (3)
A study of major writers in the age of metaphysical wit and emerging new philosophies: Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Lady Mary Wroth, Marvell, Burton, Browne, and Bunyan.

50:350:321 Eighteenth-Century Literature (3)
Major themes and writers in English from Dryden to Wollstonecraft, emphasizing the emergence of women as writers and readers of literature.

50:350:322 Romantic Period (3)
Literature of the Age of Revolution: major works of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Smith, Byron, Percy and Mary Shelley, and Keats.

50:350:324 Victorian Literature (3)
A thematic and analytic approach to the major prose and poetry of the period, with emphasis on the works of Tennyson, Browning, Rossetti, Arnold, Carlyle, and Ruskin.

Major Authors

50:350:330 Chaucer (3)
Critical analysis of The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and selected shorter works.

50:350:331 Shakespeare I (3)
A study of selected comedies, history plays, and tragedies of the Elizabethan period (to 1603).

50:350:332 Shakespeare II (3)
A study of the plays of the Jacobean period (from 1603 on), with particular emphasis on the tragedies.

50:350:333 Milton (3)
A study of the minor poems, selected prose, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes.

50:350:481,482 Readings in Major Authors (3,3)
An intensive study of the works of a single author, or of two or three related authors. Satisfies major requirement (pre-2008) “British literature before 1800.”

50:350:483,484 Readings in Major Authors (3,3)
An intensive study of the works of a single author, or of two or three related authors. Satisfies major requirement (pre-2008) “British literature after 1800.”


Back to Top

Courses by Genre

Poetry

50:350:250 How to Read a Poem (3)
This course examines contemporary poetry in terms of the ways it uses sound, rhythm, silence, metaphor, lacuna, and pace. It asks how a poem enacts an experience and conveys meaning. Students will interact with texts through group activities, including essays, presentations, readings, and discussions. Prerequisite: 50:350:102 or 220.

50:350:342 Modern British Poetry (3)
A study of the major modern poets, with emphasis on Yeats, Eliot, Auden, and Dylan Thomas.

Fiction

50:350:244 The Novel of Sensibility (3)
This course explores the major aesthetic development of the novel from the late 18th through the early 19th centuries. Roughly translated into contemporary terms, sensibility refers to a person’s refined sense of empathy and extreme sensitivity. Prerequisite: 50:350:102 or 220.

50:350:261 Texts and Adaptations (3)
A study of novels, canonical and noncanonical, and their film adaptations.

50:350:264 The Short Story (3)
A study of the short story as a literary genre by examining the works of major world authors.

50:350:265 Science Fiction (3)
A study of major works of science fiction by such authors as Bradbury, Clarke, Asimov, LeGuin, and Ellison.

50:350:275 Detective Fiction (3)
The development of this popular literary genre from its beginnings in Poe’s short stories through the present, with varying emphasis on American, British, and European authors, among them Doyle, Chandler, Faulkner, Nabokov, and Borges.

50:350:356 Rise of the Novel (3)
Selected novels of the 18th century with emphasis on Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, and Austen.

50:350:357 Nineteenth-Century British Novel (3)
Readings in the Victorian novel: Dickens, the Brontës, Trollope, Thackeray, Meredith, and George Eliot.

50:350:358 Modern British Fiction (3)
Development of the modern novel through examination of the works of the major writers of the century, with emphasis on Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, and Beckett.

50:350:382 Irish Fiction (3)
A survey of Irish fiction of the 20th century, with attention to the works of James Joyce. 

Drama

50:350:323 Romantic Drama (3)
Historical survey of English drama 1780-1830 with an emphasis on the material history of theatrical productions.

50:350:346 World Drama (G) (3)
A survey of drama throughout the world from Western and non-Western classics to forerunners of modern realism.

50:350:349 English Drama to 1642 (3)
English drama (exclusive of Shakespeare) from its origins in medieval pageantry through its Elizabethan flowering to its decadence and the Puritan closing of the theaters.

50:350:351 English Drama, 1660-1800 (3)
The English theater from the Restoration to the emergence of sentimental and “laughing” comedy.

50:350:353 Modern Drama (G) (3)
The background of the contemporary theater explored in the works of major European and British dramatists from Ibsen and Chekhov to Brecht and Beckett.

50:350:383 The Irish Literary Renaissance (3)
A study of important figures, including Yeats, Gregory, Synge, and O’Casey, in the creation of an Irish national literature beginning around 1890. 

Additional Genre Courses

50:350:247 Literature of Horror (3)
A study of the horror story from its Gothic origins to its present popularity in fiction and film.

50:350:248 Comic Literature (3)
A study of the comic tradition in British and American literature, including such writers as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Fielding, Byron, Dickens, Twain, Shaw, and Waugh, as well as some contemporary humorists.

 50:350:264 The Short Story (3)
A study of the short story as a literary genre by examining the works of major world authors.

50:350:265 Science Fiction (3)
A study of major works of science fiction by such authors as Bradbury, Clarke, Asimov, LeGuin, and Ellison.

50:350:275 Detective Fiction (3)
The development of this popular literary genre from its beginnings in Poe’s short stories through the present, with varying emphasis on American, British, and European authors, among them Doyle, Chandler, Faulkner, Nabokov, and Borges.

50:350:319 Gothic Writing (3)
A survey of British and American Gothic writing from the late 18th century to the fin-de-siècle.

50:350:370 Biography and Autobiography (3)
Exploration of the nature of these genres in works primarily British and American by such authors as Augustine, Boswell, Rousseau, Wordsworth, and Henry James.

Theme Courses

50:350:242 Reading History as Literature (3)
What we call history is the result of the way great writers shape it. The course examines not only of what happened but the narratives that have described what happened and the writers whose rhetorical skill is the overlooked, invisible agency behind historical memory.

50:350:271 Images of the Hero (3)
A study of archetypal criticism and its application to ancient and modern texts, with emphasis on the tension between individual heroes and their heroic careers.

50:350:338 Literature and the Natural Environment I (3)
Traces perceptions of nature and the roots of current environmental attitudes from ancient literature to post-Enlightenment nature writing, with emphasis on British literature from 1400-1800.

50:350:339 Literature and the Natural Environment II (3)
Looks at British, American, and Native-American nature writing since 1800 and considers how perceptions and uses of the natural world affect both nonhuman nature and the human communities within it.

50:350:367 Popular Culture (3)
A study of literature as it has been influenced by such elements of popular culture as best sellers, magazines, newspapers, film, radio, and television.

50:350:371 Literature of Travel (3)
A study of why people leave home and how they challenge the borderline between fact and fiction while converting life into literature.

50:350:372,373 Topics in Irish Literature (3,3)
A study of an aspect of a national literature that has produced four Nobel Prize winners–Yeats, Shaw, Beckett, Heaney–in the 20th century.

50:350:374 Legends Past and Present (G) (3)
Narratives of heroes, quests, supernatural occurrences, and other extraordinary activities of humans past and present, focusing on Germanic, Celtic, and Native-American cultures.

50:350:376 Literature and Psychology (3)
Psychological interpretation of the literary text; the psychology of composition and of reader response.

50:350:377 Literature and Sexuality (3)
Sexual themes, fictions, and fantasies in English and American literature: the distinction between pornographic and nonpornographic erotic writing, the grotesque, the violent, and the romantic.

50:350:379 Literature and Poverty in Western Cultures (D) (3)
A survey of attitudes toward poverty as presented in Western literatures from the ancient world to the present.

50:350:388 Women in Literature (D) (3)
Analyzes the treatment of women in selected world fiction, drama, poetry, and essays.

50:350:411 Old English Language and Literature (3)
An introduction to the reading and analysis of Old English, including Beowulf.

Backgrounds Courses

50:350:313 Classical Backgrounds of English Literature (G) (3)
The influence on English and American literature of classical Greek and Roman epic, tragedy, comedy, and other literary forms.

50:350:314 Biblical Backgrounds of English Literature (3)
The influence of the King James and other versions of the Bible on English and American literature.

50:350:335 Intellectual Backgrounds of 20th-Century Literature (3)
A study of the major works of 20th-century literature in the context of the great intellectual achievements of the past two centuries.

International Study and Special Topics Courses

50:350:389,390 International Studies (G) (3,3)
A short-term study tour abroad focusing on a literary theme, with class lectures, required readings, and written assignments.

50:350:391,392 Special Topics in Literature (1-3,1-3)
A course in a specially selected topic. Satisfies major requirement (pre-2008) “British literature before 1800.” Primarily, but not exclusively, for advanced students. Courses with different topics may be repeated for credit.

50:350:393,394 Special Topics in Literature (1-3,1-3)
A course in a specially selected topic. Satisfies major requirement (pre-2008) “British literature after 1800.” Primarily, but not exclusively, for advanced students. Courses with different topics may be repeated for credit.

50:350:395,396 Special Topics in Literature (1-3,1-3)
A course in a specially selected topic. Satisfies major requirement (pre-2008) “cross-cultural perspectives.” Primarily, but not exclusively, for advanced students. Courses with different topics may be repeated for credit.

50:350:397 Special Topics: Great Literary Origins (3)
A theme in some great works of the Western literary traditions.

50:350:407,408 Independent Study in English (BA,BA)
An opportunity for advanced students to work individually with an instructor on a self-determined course of study. The project culminates in a substantial paper.

50:350:415,416 Seminar in English Studies (Capstone) (3,3)
Capstone course for advanced students on a special topic. Prerequisites: 50:350:221 and 222.

50:350:495,496 Honors Program in English (3,3)

50:350:497,498 Internship in English (3,3)
Application of English skills in a volunteer or professional employment setting. Individually designed and evaluated experience under supervision of intern adviser. Commitment of at least 100 hours. Normally limited to English majors.


Back to Top

Courses (American Literature 352)

Survey Courses

50:352:225 American Literature Survey I (3)
Survey of the fiction, nonfiction, and poetry of America from colonial times to the Civil War.

50:352:226 American Literature Survey II (3)
Survey of the fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama of America from the Civil War to the present.

50:352:250 Survey of African-American Literature I (D) (3)
Survey of African-American literary production from its formal beginnings in the 18th century to the American Civil War.

50:352:251 Survey of African-American Literature II (D) (3)
Survey of African-American literary production from the Civil War to the early 21st century.

African-American and Multicultural Literature

50:352:250 Survey of African-American Literature I (D) (3)
Survey of African-American literary production from its formal beginnings in the 18th century to the American Civil War.

50:352:251 Survey of African-American Literature II (D) (3)
Survey of African-American literary production from the Civil War to the early 21st century.

50:352:325 Multicultural American Literature (D) (3)
Readings in multicultural literature of the United States–for example, Anglo-European, African-American, Asian-American, Chicano, Jewish-American, and Native American–with emphasis on relationships between culture and literary form, theme, and language.

50:352:351 The Harlem Renaissance (D) (3)
An investigation of writing and thought by black writers in America during the 1920s and 1930s, a period known as the Harlem Renaissance.

50:352:352 The Slave Narrative (D) (3)
The slave narrative from its beginnings in the 18th century to its more recent enunciations in 21st-century writing.

Fiction

50:352:264 American Short Fiction (3)
Short stories and novellas by diverse writers in selected periods.

50:352:337 American Novel to 1900 (3)
The development of the novel in America through the 19th century. Works by such authors as Rowson, Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Stowe, Melville, Twain, Crane, and James.

50:352:338 Modern American Novel (3)
Readings chosen from the works of leading American novelists from 1880 to 1950.

50:352:339 Postmodern American Novel (3)
Study of the development of the American novel since 1950. Readings in works by such authors as Pynchon, Coover, Barth, Walker, DeLillo, Reed, Morrison, Kingston, and Cisneros.

50:352:341 Contemporary Jewish-American Fiction (D) (3)
This course will examine novels and short stories by 20th- and 21st-century Jewish-American writers, including Bellow, Roth, and Ozick.

Poetry

50:352:305 Nineteenth-Century American Poetry (3)
Selected readings in 19th-century poetry, poetics, and culture. Syllabus may include satirical, romantic, transcendental, abolitionist, Civil War, and regional poetry, as well as folk songs, spirituals, and versions of American Indian poetry.

50:352:322 Modern American Poetry I (3)
Selected readings in modernist poetry and poetics, 1900-1950. Such authors as Pound, H.D., Eliot, Frost, Stein, Williams, Stevens, Moore, Rukeyser, and Hughes.

50:352:323 Modern American Poetry II (3)
Selected readings in postmodern poetry and poetics from 1950-present. Such authors as Brooks, Ginsberg, Plath, Baraka, O’Hara, Ashbery, Soto, Rich, and Hejinian.

Historical Periods and Movements

50:352:308 American Renaissance I (3)
Early to mid-19th-century Romantic writers such as Emerson, Fuller, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Poe, Douglass, and Jacobs.

50:352:309 American Renaissance II (3)
Mid- to late-19th-century Romantic writers such as Stowe, Melville, Dickinson, Whittier, Harper, and Wilson.

50:352:311 American Realism and Naturalism (3)
Readings in post-Civil War writers such as Twain, James, Howells, Crane, Wharton, Dreiser, Chopin, Chesnutt, and Dunbar.

50:352:351 The Harlem Renaissance (D) (3)
An investigation of writing and thought by black writers in America during the 1920s and 1930s, a period known as the Harlem Renaissance.

50:352:313 Recent American Writing (3)
Readings in American poetry, fiction, and drama since 1950.

Additional Genres

50:352:329 American Drama (3)
The development of drama in the United States, with emphasis on 20th-century themes and forms. Likely playwrights include O’Neill, Stein, Williams, Odets, Hansberry, Miller, Albee, Wilson, Kushner, and Wasserstein.

50:352:370 American Autobiography (3)
Autobiography, memoir, and other life writings, with attention to the act of writing, construction of selfhood, memory, and personal and cultural history.

Children’s Literature

50:352:347 The American Child in Literature and Culture (D) (3)
Literary views of childhood and youth in the context of American nationhood, with attention to innocence, protection, violence, diversity, and citizenship.

50:352:348 Literature of Adolescence (D) (3)
Literary, cultural, and historical constructions of adolescence in a range of literature written for young readers.

Major Authors

50:352:436,437 Major Writers of America (3,3)
An intensive study of the works of a single author, or of two or three related authors.

50:352:451 Major African-American Writers (D) (3)
An intensive study of the principal works of two or three major African-American writers.

Special Topics

50:352:391,392 Special Topics in American Literature (3,3)
A course in a specially selected topic. Primarily, but not exclusively, for advanced students. Courses with different topics may be repeated for credit.

50:352:393,394 Special Topics in American Literature (1-3,1-3)
A course in a specially selected topic. Satisfies the major requirement (pre-2008) for “cross-cultural perspectives.” Primarily, but not exclusively, for advanced students. Courses with different topics may be repeated for credit.

50:352:407,408 Independent Study in American Literature (BA,BA)
An opportunity for advanced students to work individually with an instructor on a self-determined course of study. The project culminates in a substantial paper.

50:352:491,492 Seminar in American Literature (3,3)
An opportunity for juniors and seniors to pursue advanced study of literature in a small-group format.

50:352:495,496 Honors Program in American Literature (3,3)


Back to Top

Courses in Writing, Linguistics, Film, and Journalism

Writing (989)

50:989:300 Writing Public Arguments (W) (3)
Intensive study and practice in the rhetoric of argument; emphasis on composing persuasive texts addressing the public on a range of issues. Formerly Persuasive Writing.

50:989:301 The Art of Revision (W) (3)
Intensive practice in composing and revising texts with an emphasis on developing audience awareness and a clear, fluid style. Formerly The Art of Writing.

50:989:302 Technical Communication (W) (3)
Practice in producing usable, informative, reader-based documents in a range of media (written, oral, electronic) with an emphasis on collaboration and on communicating specialized knowledge to nontechnical audiences. Formerly Scientific and Technical Writing.

50:989:303 Business Writing (W) (3)
Intensive study and practice in organizational communication; emphasis on workplace genres including correspondence, reports, presentations, and employment documents. Formerly Writing for the Professions.

50:989:304 Introduction to Writing Studies (3)
An orientation to theoretical, historical, and pedagogical issues associated with writing as cognitive, social, and material practice. Formerly The Teaching of Writing.

50:989:305 Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
Introduction to the writer’s craft that surveys available genres of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

50:989:306 Poetry Writing Workshop (3)
Study of the creative process involved in the writing of poetry, the techniques and discipline required, and trends in contemporary poetry.

50:989:307 Fiction Writing Workshop (3)
Study and practice of specific stylistic techniques used by professional writers in fiction and nonfiction. For students with a serious interest in writing.

50:989:308 The Personal Essay (3)
Writing workshop focusing on the use of personal autobiographical material.

50:989:311 Advanced Academic Writing (W) (3)
Intensive study and practice of writing in academic contexts with an emphasis on scholarly standards in research, exposition, and argumentation.

50:989:312 Writing New Media (W) (3)
Introduction to writing in digital and networked environments; emphasis on how technology shapes discourse in emerging genres associated with the World Wide Web.

50:989:390 Special Topics in Writing (W) (3)
Course with a specific genre of writing as chosen by the instructor.

50:989:401,402 Advanced Writing (3,3)
Advanced instruction and practice in expository, scientific, technical, or business writing.

50:989:403,404 Advanced Creative Writing (3,3)
Advanced work in creative writing.

50:989:407,408 Independent Study Creative Writing (3,3)
The opportunity for advanced students to work individually with an instructor on a self-designed creative writing project. The project culminates in a substantial work of fiction, creative nonfiction, or poetry.

50:989:461 Poetry Writing II (3)
Advanced and further study of the creative process involved in the writing of poetry. Prerequisite: 50:989:306 or permission of instructor.

50:989:463 Fiction Writing II (3)
Advanced and further study of the creative process involved in the writing of fiction. Prerequisite: 50:989:307 or permission of instructor.

Linguistics (615)

50:615:201 Principles of Linguistics (3)
Introduction to linguistics and its areas of inquiry, such as sociolinguistics, syntax, semantics, phonetics, phonology, and morphology. Techniques of linguistic analysis and their applications to various languages.

50:615:202 Applied Linguistics (3)
A survey of the applications of linguistics in various areas: the media, advertising, language acquisition, and English as a second language. Other topics include analysis of spoken discourse, language planning, and standardization. Prerequisite: 50:615:201 or permission of instructor.

50:615:225 Language, Class, and Culture (D) (3)
A nontechnical study of social and geographical language differences, how men’s and women’s speech differs, standard versus nonstandard dialects, formal and informal speech styles, bilingualism, pidgin, and creole languages.

50:615:240 Introduction to Language (3)
Nontheoretical overview of basic grammatical concepts and general interest questions relating to language, such as dialects, how ordinary conversation works, the origins of language, and more.

50:615:331 Linguistics and Literature (3)
Application of concepts of linguistic analysis to the interpretation of literary texts. Topics include metaphor, speech acts, politeness, inference, point of view, and speech/thought presentation.

50:615:336 Modern American Grammar (3)
A linguistic approach to English grammar. Theoretical and practical implications of English phonology, morphology, and syntax.

50:615:341 Language, Power, and Politics (D) (3)
Examination of a range of political issues concerning language, including language attitudes (discrimination, “authority,” and “correctness” in language), dialects/standard language ideology, political speech, language policy in the United States, advertising, gender, politically correct language, and ecolinguistics.

50:615:380 History of the English Language (3)
A linguistic study of the English language at various periods of its history, the process of change from one period to another, and the relationship of English to other languages.

50:615:386,387 Special Studies in Linguistics (3,3)
A course in a specially selected topic. Primarily, but not exclusively, for advanced students. Courses with different topics may be repeated for credit. 

50:615:495,496 Independent Study in Linguistics (BA,BA)
An opportunity for advanced students to work individually with an instructor on a self-determined course of study. The project culminates in a substantial paper. Prerequisite: 50:615:201 or permission of instructor.

Film (354)

Courses listed below may be included in the minor program in Media Studies (657)

50:354:300 History of Film (3)
The development of major film movements, with particular attention to the technical and stylistic contributions of major directors.

50:354:310 Literature and Film (3)
Adaptations from other narrative and dramatic forms; relations between literary and film conventions; special problems in adapting literary works to film.

50:354:315 American Film (3)
The American film from the silent period to the present; concentrated study of several major directors such as Ford, Hawks, and Welles.

50:354:320 World Cinema (G) (3)
Major developments and achievements in French, Italian, British, Russian, and other national cinemas; cross-influences between foreign and American cinema.

50:354:350 Major Filmmakers (G) (3)
The viewing, analysis, and discussion of selected films by such directors as Griffith, Eisenstein, Ford, Huston, Welles, Bergman, Fellini, Buñuel, and Kurosawa.

50:354:391,392,393,394 Special Topics in Film (3,3,3,3)
A course in a specially selected topic. Primarily, but not exclusively, for advanced students. Courses with different topics may be repeated for credit.

50:354:395 Screenwriting (3)
Instruction and practice in preparing screenplays for production.

50:354:396,397,398,399 Studies in Film Genres (3,3,3,3)
Intensive study of a particular genre of film, including the musical, the western, the crime drama, the comedy, or science fiction film.

50:354:401 Advanced Screenwriting (3) An advanced course in screenwriting for students who have already mastered the basics of screenplay structure and writing. Prerequisite: 50:354:395 or permission of instructor.

(Journalism 570)

50:570:300 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)
A survey course examining the history and modern developments of newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, movies, music, the internet, advertising, and public relations.

50:570:301,302 News Reporting and Writing (3,3)
The basic “straight” news story, with excursions into the second-day story and the follow-up; emphasis on writing professionally.

50:570:303 Issues in Contemporary Journalism (3) An examination of issues facing journalists today and the changing nature of the journalist’s job in our present 24-7 news delivery system.

50:570:304 Political Reporting (3)
Taught during the presidential election year, this course focuses on the functions and responsibilities of being a political reporter and the impact that role has on election outcomes.

50:350:305 Opinion Writing (3)
Covering several forms of opinion writing, from commentaries on current events to critiquing artistic endeavors to personal blogs, students will develop a voice and point of view.

50:570:306 Urban Reporting (3)
With Camden as a canvas, students will report on several aspects of the urban environment –from city government and politics, to criminal justice, to housing and community development, to health care.

50:570:307 Public Relations (3)
An introduction to the field of public relations (PR), which will lay a groundwork toward developing the skills required to become a PR professional.

50:570:308 Law and Order (3)
Covering Police and the Courts: Explores the various aspects of reporting on the criminal justice system, from working with police and following criminal investigations to covering criminal and civil court trials to investigative reporting and research tapping into the wealth of available data, statistics, and records.

50:570:319 Copy Editing I (3)
Basic copy editing and headline writing. Prerequisites: At least one semester of 50:570:301,302.

50:570:320 Copy Editing II (3)
Emphasis on newspaper layout and story selection, plus selecting and cropping photographs. Prerequisite: 50:570:319.

50:570:335 Freelance Article Writing (3)
Magazine writing from the initial idea to the completed manuscript, including possible publication.

50:570:336 Review Writing (3)
Analysis of styles and trends in contemporary reviewing, with instruction and practice in writing criticism of books, theater, cinema, and various other arts.

50:570:338 Writing for Broadcast Journalism (3)
Fundamentals of writing for broadcast media, primarily radio and television.

50:570:395,396 Special Studies in Journalism (3,3)
A course in a specially selected topic. Primarily, but not exclusively, for advanced students. Courses with different topics may be repeated for credit.

50:570:491,492 Independent Study in Journalism (BA,BA)
An opportunity for advanced students to pursue their interests in journalism in a self-determined course of study under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites:

50:570:301,302, and 335 with a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0.

Back to Top