Fall 2017

UndergraduateMAMFA

50:350:201 Introduction to English Studies
TTh 3:35-4:55
Hostetter

 

An introduction to the discipline of English Studies. The course is intended to answer the question: What are we doing and learning when we major in English? We will explore the conventions, methods, assumptions, and concerns of some of the sub-disciplines in English studies, including literature and literary criticism, creative writing, composition, rhetoric, linguistics, film/media studies, and journalism. This particular version of the course takes as its subject the great Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, and examines it from many angles and adaptations. Fulfills the AAI General Education category. Required for English majors.

 

50:350:221 Literatures in English I
Th 2:00-4:50
Fitter

 

This course takes you back to the mists and horrors of the Dark Ages (Beowulf), then follows a path out into the daylight of the High Middle Ages, the age of castles, great cathedrals, and new learning (Gawain and the Green Knight.) It travels on as far as the Renaissance, with its great hopes for transforming the world through knowledge and reason (Erasmus and More), its dazzling discovery of complex human psychology (Shakespeare), and its sickening plummet, in England, into the failure of the brave new Republic, lamented by Milton in Paradise Lost. This tour of  literary history allows brief introductions to otherwise scary classical authors (Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton), and it brings home to us, with graphic detail, the good fortune we enjoy today in having developed beyond cultures tyrannized by altar and crown. Grades to be determined by midterm, term paper, final exam, and class participation. Fulfills the HAC General Education category. This course will satisfy the new literary history requirement as a pre-1800 course. It can also satisfy the pre-1800 literature requirement under old major.

 


50:350:222 Literatures in English II

Th 6:00-8:50
Barbarese

 

Historical survey of literatures written in English (primarily British and American literatures) from 1660 to 1900. We begin with the often filthy poems of Rochester and cloacal meditations of Swift, offset by work of Anne Bradstreet, America’s Tenth Muse, Puritan divine Edward Taylor, drop in on Pope, and are finally reanimated by the British and American Romantics: Barbauld, Blake, Wordsworth, Austin, Coleridge, Mary and PB Shelly, and roll to a slow stop with Whitman, Poe and Hawthorne. Along the way we glance at significant events in British and American history, familiarize ourselves with the monarchy and revolution through readings in Burke, Wollstonecraft, Jefferson and Paine. Quizzes (weekly), midterm, a paper, and a final. The course anthology will be supplied by the instructor and the student will be obligated to purchase two or three inexpensive novels. This course will satisfy the new literary history requirement as a pre-1800 course. It can also satisfy the pre-1800 literature requirement under old major.



50:350:232 World Novel 20th Century
MW 9:35-10:55
Martin

 

50:350:238 World Masterpieces
Online
Meredith

 

50:350:261 Texts and Film
MW 2:05-3:25
Ledoux

 

50:350:300 Foundations in Literature
MW 9:35-10:55
Fiske

 

50:350:304 Women in Speculative Fiction
MW 2:05-3:25
Sayre

 

50:350:305 Special Topics: Poetry and Performance
TTh 11:10-12:30
Rosal

 

50:350:319 Gothic Writing
MW 12:30-1:50
Ledoux

 

50:350:330 Chaucer
T 6:00-8:50
Hostetter

 

50:350:332 Shakespeare II
TTh 6:00-7:20
Fitter

 

50:350:360 Literature of Childhood
90 Online
Vial

 

50:350:392 Global Perceptions of Race, Religion and Gender
TTh 11:10-12:30
Habib

 

50:350:415 Capstone: My Favorite Books
MW 3:45-5:05
Sayre

 

50:352:311 American Realism and Naturalism
TTh2:00-3:20
Singley

 

50:352:325 Multicultural American Literature
TTh 6:00-7:20
Singley

 

50:354:201 Art of Film
T 6:00-8:50
Staff

 

50:354:390 Special Topics: The Journalist in and on Film
T 2:00-4:50
Capuzzo

 

50:570:201 Inside Reporting
MW 12:30-1:50
Capuzzo

 

50:570:310 Special Topics: Food Writing
MW 9:35-10:55
Capuzzo

 

50:615:201 Principles of Linguistics
TTh 3:35-4:55
Epstein

 

50:989:200 Introduction to Professional Writing
MW 10:20-11:15
DuBose

 

(W)50:989:300 Writing Public Arguments
Online
Staff

 

(W)50:989:301 Art of Revision
MF 9:35-10:55
Staff

 

50:989:302 Technical Communication
Online
DuBose

 

50:989:305 Introduction to Creative Writing
Online
Fandler

 

50:989:306 Poetry Workshop
01MW2:05-3:25
Pardlo

 

50:989:307 Fiction Workshop
WF 12:30-1:50
Carrieri

 

50:989:315 Theory and Practice of Tutoring Writing
WF 12:30-1:50
DuBose

 

50:989:401 Advanced Creative Writing
T 2:00-4:50
Barbarese

 

56:350:503 Introduction to Graduate Literary Study
M 6:00-8:50
Green

 


56:350:571 Victorian Literature, Literature and Culture in Childhood

Cross-listed with 56:606:511:01
W 6:00-8:50
Fiske

 

56:615:560 Language, Power and Politics
Cross-listed with 56:606:612:01
Th6:00-8:50
Epstein

 

56:842:565 Special Topics: Comparative Textual Media
Cross-listed with 56:606:609:01
T 6:00-8:50
Brown

 

56:842:569 Practicum in the Teaching of Writing
W 3:00-5:40
FitzGerald

 

56:200:517 Fiction Workshop
Th 2:00-4:50 Grodstein

 

 

56:200:519 Poetry Workshop
Th 6:00-8:50 Rosal

 

 

56:200:565 Craft: Memoir
M 6:00-8:50 Pardlo

 

 

56:200:571 Special Topics in Craft: Screenplay
T 2:00-4:50 Zeidner

 

 

56:200:651 Final Creative Thesis
By Arrangement
Barbarese, Grodstein,Pardlo, Rosal, Zeidner